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Saturday, October 29, 2016

Phoenix Sinks Plumbing for the Common Homeowner

Phoenix Sinks Plumbing
Phoenix Sinks Plumbing
Phoenix sinks plumbing are a central part of Phoenix kitchen plumbing. So it can be a pretty big deal when one stops working right when you need it. A kitchen sink is super important, and yet it is prone to some common issues like leaking/clogged faucets, clogged drains, broken disposals, and leaking bowls. If you run into any of these problems, there might be something you can do about it though.

Phoenix Sinks Plumbing
Phoenix Sinks Plumbing
If your sink suffers from a clogged faucet, it may be because there is something behind that little grill-like thing (its real name is the aerator). You can try removing the aerator and running the water to flush the system of all chucks or pieces of things that get in the way. If it is just dripping, there may be a loose or corroded washer or something wasn't put on tight enough. Again, take off the aerator and check the parts. Be sure to know what you're doing so you don't end up making the problem worse!

For clogged drains, its likely some food or other block is down the pipes. You can try using a drain snake to break up any clogs. Chemicals like Drano are also an option, but be very careful. Harsh chemicals can damage plumbing and they aren't good around food. If the problem isn't fixed, it may be time to call a plumber.

Phoenix Sinks Plumbing
Phoenix Sinks Plumbing
A broken disposal is no joking matter. The best that most of us can do is try to reset the disposal by looking for a reset button on the unit under the sink. If resetting the disposal doesn't work, you will need to call a plumber to fix your Phoenix sinks plumbing.

A leaking bowl can be a real issue. Usually its because the sealant between the bowl and counter has come off. It is possible to take care of this yourself. However, it will not look as professional or as good as calling a plumber to come take care of the job for you. The technicians professional Phoenix sinks plumbing expertise will help him get all you problems fixed the best way possible.




Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Unknown Explosives: Phoenix Water Heater Plumbing

Phoenix Water Heater Plumbing
Phoenix Water Heater Plumbing
If you don't think a lot about your Phoenix water heater plumbing, you're not alone.  Most of us don't give a second thought to the water heater, it just sits in the garage working tirelessly.  Mythbusters did a show a while ago putting water heaters to the limit. The result was literally explosive.  A water heater can withstand enormous amounts of pressure, some can be rated up to 150 psi, or 10 times atmospheric pressure.  In the test, the Mythbusters were able to get the tank up to 300 psi, which eventually shot the tank like a rocket.  This test was done with all safety measures removed, something you usually don't have to deal with, but water heater failure is still a danger to you in your home.

Phoenix Water Heater Plumbing
Phoenix Water Heater Plumbing
Proper maintenance is important to keeping a water happy and healthy and providing you optimal comfort at home.  A water heater is usually made to last 5 years, but to prevent a catastrophic failure, it is a good idea to schedule a yearly inspection by a plumber.  This can help prevent any rusting or build-up that results in leaks or other problems.

Most of the time improper maintenance won't result in a water heater blowing through your roof -but it is better to be safe than to be sorry.  Even if you think the risk of an exploding water heater isn't enough reason to keep an eye on your water heater, you can prevent more common issues like a flooded garage or not enough hot water by having it inspected regularly.  It is also worth it to check on the heater monthly by checking your

T&P (temperature and pressure) valve monthly.  Check on how to test the valve for your specific model, but it should have a little bit of water output.  If it doesn't, there is probably an issue with your heater, and you need a plumber to come fix it before the problem worsens.

Friday, October 21, 2016

How do Phoenix Plumbing Faucets Really Work?

Phoenix Plumbing Faucets
Phoenix Plumbing Faucets
How much do you actually know about Phoenix plumbing faucets?  If you're like me, you probably don't have too much experience with them.  But in reality, they're pretty simple plumbing fixtures.  A faucet is really just to control water flow in a sink. But it can be a little more fancy depending on how you like it.

Phoenix Plumbing Faucets
Phoenix Plumbing Faucets
A faucet starts with two hoses, one for hot water and one for cold water.  The two hoses feed into the actual fixture itself and get mixed there.  The faucet has a handle or dial that lets you set the temperature and pressure of the water you want.  This works because the handle is linked to a valve where the water is mixed.  If you want hot water, then more hot water is mixed with less cool water.  If you want cool water, then more cool water is mixed with less hot water.  And if you want high pressure, the valve opens more.  If you want a lower pressure, the valve opens less.

The water then actually comes out of the faucet.  Now, while the water is moving through the faucet and as it comes out, it may deposit minerals. This happens mostly when water evaporates on or in the faucet, leaving behind any minerals that were in the water.  If your faucet has build up, you can clean it off, but you may want to check how hard your water is.  It may be a good choice to soften the water.

Phoenix Plumbing Faucets
Phoenix Plumbing Faucets
After you use the water, it drains out of the sink.  In bathroom sinks it is common to have one more part of the faucet, a drain plug.  In kitchen sinks this is usually a separate piece you place in the drain, but bathroom sinks commonly have them build in as a rod you can pull or press to use the plug.  It is connected by two long slender rods or strips of metal that act as a lever to raise or lower the plug.

So there's a pretty basic run-down of Phoenix plumbing faucets.  They're a common plumbing fixture, but one that we don't always know.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

New Upgrades May be Coming to Phoenix Toilet Plumbing

Phoenix Toilet Plumbing
Phoenix Toilet Plumbing
Phoenix toilet plumbing has seemed pretty standard for a long time now.  We've all grown used to seeing toilets with big tanks in our homes.  But a change may be on the rise.  Gravity flush toilets, the ones we are used to seeing at home, have long stayed pretty much the same, even with semi-recent additions of light vs. heavy flush.  These toilets work by allowing the water that was built up in the tank to fall and force the water in the bowl to flush.  This can use a lot of water, but recent advancements have made it much more efficient.  This system also makes it possible for the toilet to operate on low water pressure, which may be a necessity in some homes.  Because of this and their incredible simplicity and ease of repair, they have remained a favorite for a very long time.  Another option looms on the horizon however.
Phoenix Toilet Plumbing
Phoenix Toilet Plumbing

Assisted flush toilets, also known as tank-less toilets, may be gaining popularity in residential applications.  Tank-less toilets are very popular in commercial and public bathrooms.  That's why the bathroom at your local grocery store looks so different from the one at home.  This kind of toilet works on high water pressure that helps create a siphoning effect to drain the toilet bowl.  Gravity flush toilets work without this high water pressure.  Most homes only can provide low water pressure, but there may be a push to have this changed.
Phoenix Toilet Plumbing
Phoenix Toilet Plumbing

Tank-less toilets allow for more user control over aspects lie how much water is flushed.  This allows the systems to be more efficient and to fit the users' needs better than a traditional gravity fed toilet.  As demand increases, homes may start adapting plumbing to prepare for the rise of assisted flush toilets in residential demand.  Hopefully we see great improvement in Phoenix toilet plumbing.



Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Keeping a Steady Flow With Phoenix Plumbing Drain

Phoenix Plumbing Drain
Phoenix Plumbing Drain
Phoenix plumbing drain sucks.  No really, drains suck, and that's a good thing.  Hopefully the drains in your home are working their best and are sucking down whatever you are putting into them.  But we have to be careful, sometimes we put things in drains that really should go there, without even thinking about it.

Phoenix Plumbing Drain
Phoenix Plumbing Drain
The main purpose of your drain is to get water out of the sink.  Its also pretty good at getting other things out, like small food scraps in the kitchen or soapy residue in the bathroom.  But your drain can only take so much.  Most drains have a handy-dandy feature called a p-trap.  Its a pipe that with a curve in it that traps some water at the bottom.  Why do you want some water trapped at the bottom?  Well, it keeps smells and gases from the sewer or other drains in your house from coming back up the pipes and stinking up your house!  The problem is that this p-trap holds on to pretty much anything, water or not.  So when we flush food down the drain, its pretty likely that at least some of it will end up in the p-trap.  Over time, enough water should push this stuff out or break it down.  But if you do too much too often, a layer of stuff starts to build in your p-trap, making it harder for the drain to get rid of water.  If this goes for too long, your Phoenix plumbing drain can get backed up and then you may need to call a plumber to get it unstuck!
Phoenix Plumbing Drain
Phoenix Plumbing Drain

One thing we may not think about a lot in Arizona, I know I don't, is oil.  When its hot, the oil is liquid, so it should be fine to pour down the drain right?  Wrong.  When oil is near room temperature (this kind of depends, but definitely when its cool) it can harden up and turn into a nice gel.  So if you pour some down the drain and it gets stuck, it could cool down and form an annoying block in your pipes!  Be careful with your oil!

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

How Your Phoenix Plumbing Bathtub Keeps From Burning You

Have you ever wondered what would happen if you turned on only the hot water in your tub?  Well... it wouldn't be very comfortable.  The good news is that won't happen.  And the scald guard is to thank for that.
Phoenix Plumbing Bathtub
Phoenix Plumbing Bathtub

Now a scald guard does exactly what its name sounds like: it protects you from getting scalded when you use the bath tub.  The scald guard limits the maximum temperature of the water and keeps it from getting hot enough to burn you.  A hot water heater in your home pumps out some really hot water, so hot that it is dangerous for you.  To make sure that this hot water doesn't reach you, a scald guard mixes in some cold water, lowering the temperature of the hot water and extending how much "hot water" your water heater produces.



Phoenix Plumbing Bathtub
Phoenix Plumbing Bathtub
There are a couple different designs that make this work. The most simple uses the pressures in the water lines to prevent water from getting too hot. If water pressure in the cold line falls too low, the hot water is also restricted, limiting how hot your water can get.  Another design works on a built in thermostat.  When the temperature gets too high, the thermostat starts to close off the hot water line, leaving it at a hot -but not dangerous- temperature when it reaches you.  Both of the designs help keep you safe and prevent burns that could cause serious damage.  Burns are especially dangerous to those who don't think about the hot water before they turn on the faucet.  So to keep young ones safe, make sure you have a good scald guard on your faucets and shower!

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Phoenix Plumbing Heating: The Basics of Water Heaters



Phoenix Plumbing Heating
Phoenix Plumbing Heating
Like most other home conveniences, a reliable supply of warm water is only truly recognized when it stops. And if it stops when you're in the shower, this realization can arrive quite suddenly. Fortunately, it won’t normally happen. The Phoenix plumbing heating systems that create hot water are normally reliable and run for years without a problem. But when the issue arrives, some knowledge can help. Even if you don’t make the repairs yourself, you'll know

better what to tell the doctor when they arrive.

Most Phoenix plumbing heating systems have a tank-type water heater. If you have a large, cylindrical tank standing on end with multiple pipes attached to it, you have a tank-type system. If you can’t find a tank, but do have a hot-water heating system that warms your house, it's probably that the hot water getting to your taps is heated with the boiler. In some cases, hot water may be provided by a stand-alone water heater that's mounted in the vicinity of the fixture it serves.

Let's look at what's going on within a water heater's tank to see exactly how simply and succinctly it does its job.

Phoenix Plumbing Heating
Phoenix Plumbing Heating
A water heater's thermostat monitors the temperature of the water inside the tank. Normally, you can make the temperature between 120 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit (49 to 82 degrees Celsius). The water temperature setting recommended by most manufacturers is around 120 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit (49 to 60 degrees Celsius). This is warm enough to be effective for home use, but not so boiling that it can create a scalding risk. If there are kids living in your house, it's best to stay closer to the cooler end of the range.

Electric water heaters run by use of either one or two direct immersion heating elements, moderated by either thermostats or a microprocessor, which heats the water in the tank to the perfect temperature. Multiple options exist, including the wattage/voltage of the elements, the type of material of which the elements are made of, the quantity of insulating foam around the tank, in addition to the storage ability of the tank.

Saturday, October 8, 2016

Thermostatic vs Pressure Showers: Saving Phoenix Shower Plumbing Since the Beginning

Phoenix Shower Plumbing
Phoenix Shower Plumbing
Previously, hopping around in the shower was not rare at all when anyone else in a home was using cold water. The cold water use elsewhere in the house would create a pressure drop in the cold water system. This new imbalance would lead to an unexpected decrease in the cold water pressure, raising the water temperature.

In the early 1900s, two-handled shower valves were the norm for Phoenix shower plumbing and contributed to thermal shock and scalding incidents on a regular basis. To change this, some manufacturers released single-handled shower valves. First designs of these valves lacked maximum temperature limit stops, and few had pressure compensation.

In 1973, the American Society of Sanitary Engineering (ASSE) came out with the 1016 standard to create the requirements for showers hoping to reduce the risk of thermal shock and scalding. The standard required a maximum temperature limit stop of 120 F.

Thermal shock and scalding can occur without difficulty with Phoenix shower plumbing

. Protecting yourself against them is one of the most important things you can do for your home, especially if you have kids. Installing anti-scald devices in your shower is a way to start protecting yourself. The two primary types are pressure-balance valves and thermostatic valves.


Phoenix Shower Plumbing
Phoenix Shower Plumbing
Pressure balance valves run by sensing the pressure ratio of the hot and cold water the pipes are receiving rather than the actual water temperature.

A pressure balance shower control is composed of one handle that controls both the amount and the temperature of the water coming out. 

A large advantage of pressure balance, rather than thermostatic, is the cost; pressure balance showers are more cost-efficient.

A thermostatic shower keeps the temperature stable. Thermostatic valves sense water temperature and releases both the hot and cold, mixing them, to create the ideal temperature.

Thermostatic showers are safer for kids, who are more at risk of shower scalds, thanks to their ability to maintain a constant temperature. They’re also better for the lazy who don’t want to use the effort messing with the handles to get the right water temperature.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Water Hammer - A Phoenix Plumbing Home Nightmare!



Phoenix plumbing home
Phoenix plumbing home
Phoenix plumbing home, water hammer, a nightmare! Water hammer is usually identified by a clanging or rapping in the water pipes. The noise can happen when the flow of traveling water is suddenly ceased by a closing valve, or there are loose pipes in the sheetrock, or there is a broken washer on a faucet.

The quick ceasing of the flow, or a "pause" caused by a loose or bad washer, causes a pressure spike behind the valve which behaves like a tiny eruption within the pipe. This eruption causes shock waves in the water that will "echo" throughout the entire plumbing piping, rattling and banging pipes, especially loose pipes, until it dissipates.

In Phoenix plumbing home, if you have ever heard the pipes rattle, or “bang” when the toilet fills, or when the washing machine is done filling, you have water hammer! As was stated above, water hammer is created by the sudden ceasing or change in direction of water flow. This is very common problem in home plumbing. Mostly, water hammer does not create any damage to the plumbing but it can be very disturbing. Rarely, water hammer can cause failure to joints or pipes.

The 1st thing to do when you hear water hammer in your home is to go and check the water pressure. Frequently, you will hear much more hammering and banging noises when the home's water pressure is too high. Determine the water pressure with a gauge that can be affixed to an exterior hose bib or behind the washing machine. If the pressure is above seventy-five per-sq.-inch, then a pressure regulator should be put in, or replaced, if the current one has gone bad. The new pressure regulator will help maintain a consistent water pressure and thereby stop the water hammer.


Phoenix plumbing home
Phoenix plumbing home
It could be that your Phoenix plumbing home's water pressure is within the normal limits but you have recently installed an appliance; this is causing a water hammer. If that is the case, you can buy and install a water hammer arrester at the source to cease the hammering. Look for a water hammer arrester that can fit onto an existing water shut off valve. Find them at your home improvement or hardware store.

As with every plumbing part, water pressure regulators will go bad someday. If you discern water hammering of any kind, more water pressure, less water pressure, or other strange things in the water pressure; it may be an indicator that the water pressure regulator is going bad. Check the water pressure with a gauge if there are any questions of the regulator’s veracity. Checking the water pressure annually is always a great idea.

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Could Your Phoenix Pipe Plumbing be Impacting Your Health?

Phoenix Pipe Plumbing
Phoenix Pipe Plumbing
If your Phoenix pipe plumbing uses galvanized piping, you might notice how the water is sometimes a little... different.  Galvanized pipes are steel pipes coated in zinc to prevent rusting.  These pipes were installed in homes as the common practice from the early 1900s up to sometime around the second World War.  When they first were installed, these pipes weren't an issue.  But with wear and tear over time, the pipes lost the protective zinc coating on the interior, allowing the steel inside the pipe to rust. Eventually, this rust flakes off and is brought with the rest of the water to any bath tub, sink, or toilet in your home.  This can discolor the water and give it a metallic taste.  This rust isn't going to impact your health too much, but if you start seeing discolored water or if your water starts tasting metallic, call a plumber to look at your pipes.  You may need to have them replaced.
Phoenix Pipe Plumbing
Phoenix Pipe Plumbing

One of the other major issues with galvanized plumbing is its tendency to hold onto lead.  If your water had lead in it at some point before, galvanized plumbing will have reacted with the lead and there may still be some in the pipe.  When the pipe rusts and wears down this lead can be released into the water supply, perpetuating a problem of leaded water long after the original source of the issue has been addressed.

Phoenix Pipe Plumbing
Phoenix Pipe Plumbing
Fortunately, this is a problem that you likely won't have to deal with.  Galvanized pipe was only really installed pre-WWII, so if your home was built post-WWII your Phoenix pipe plumbing likely won't face these issues.  Even if your home is older, the pipes may have already been replaced.  But even if the pipes have previously been replaced it may not be a bad idea to check for the issues associated with it.



Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing: A Quick Guide To Choosing Your Best Showerhead




Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing
Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing
Out of all the plumbing you use daily, Phoenix home shower plumbing is one of the most important for finding your daily comfort.  How great is it to come home after a long day and be able to enjoy a warm shower?  How do you get the most comfort out of your shower?  And how do you do it while spending the least amount of money, both to install and over time for monthly utility costs?  Well, most of that comes from your choice of shower head.  So what are your choices when it comes to shower heads?

The standard shower head is a single spray head.  It usually comes with a function to switch between multiple spray methods and has a ball joint which allows the head to be rotated to change the direction of spray.  Because these shower heads are so basic they are inexpensive, prices can range from $5 to $50, but a nicer looking finish can end up costing more.
Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing
Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing

Another shower head common to Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing is a hand-held shower head.  This shower head is a mounted on a handheld rod attached to a long flexible pipe, allowing you to remove it from the wall and move it around to reach hard-to-get areas.  This system may run you up to $200 again based on finish and quality of fixture.
Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing
Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing

One option for those who prefer more of a rain fall like shower is a ceiling mounted shower head.  Mounting the head on the ceiling allows the water to fall straight down to you, creating the sensation of rain.  These systems spread the same amount of water over a greater area, creating a feeling of lower pressure and using less water in the process.

Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing
Phoenix Home Shower Plumbing
The last common shower head uses a sliding bar.  The sliding bar allows for quick and easy height adjustments, meaning different users can adapt the shower to their own height.  While it is possible to change the direction of spray with a single spray head, it can't adjust to drastic differences as well as a sliding bar.  This system can be quite useful for a shower that will be used by a variety of people such as a guest bathroom.


One thing that you as a homeowner should look for in order to help you save money is for your shower head to have an aerator, which adds air to the water, making it feel higher-pressure while using less water.  This feature will save you a significant amount of money yearly.  Hopefully this will help you with your next Phoenix home shower plumbing needs.

Monday, October 3, 2016

Phoenix Home Plumbing: Back to the Basics

Phoenix Home Plumbing
Phoenix Home Plumbing
Phoenix home plumbing, do you miss it yet? If you have ever spent a few days camping, you have most likely been reminded of the luxury of modern plumbing. By surviving without running water, a warm shower, or a functional toilet, you can better appreciate how crucial these are to typical life.

A Phoenix home plumbing system is a complicated system of water supply pipes, drainpipes, vent pipes, and more. Because plumbing is not easy and one of the more expensive systems to fix or put into a home, it is worthwhile to be aware of how the system works.

The drain-waste-vent system removes all the used water and waste from the home to the septic/sewer system. It's a system of drain pipes that connects to all the sinks, toilets, baths, showers, and washer.

The majority of newer waste systems use rugged plastic PVC (polyvinyl chloride) or ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) pipe that is sealed with glue. Older homes typically use cast iron pipe sealed with solder.

However, newer Phoenix home plumbing systems may use cast iron pipe sealed with neoprene in some places as a method to avoid the sound plastic generates when water is rushing through it.

Phoenix Home Plumbing
Phoenix Home Plumbing
The soil stack is the primary piece of the waste drain. It's a vertical "stack" of tubes that starts in the basement/crawlspace floor or wall where it joins the outbound sewer/septic line.

The top end of the stack is similar to a vent. It extends vertically out through the ceiling, permitting gases to get outside and also helps promote drain flow by pulling air inward.

A clogged vent can trap hazardous gases and inhibits drainage; similar to plugging a drinking straw with your finger to capture liquid.

Sunday, October 2, 2016

Common Phoenix Kitchen Plumbing Issues Tips and Tricks

Phoenix Plumbing Kitchen
Phoenix Plumbing Kitchen
Phoenix plumbing kitchen issues can be some of the most annoying issues you run into.  The kitchen is one of the most used rooms in your house, and it has lots of spots for something to go wrong.  Anything from a leaky kitchen faucet to a broken dishwasher to low water pressure.  How do you know what you can do and what to expect?  Most of the super common kitchen issues are a relatively simple fix.  Here’s what you can look for and maybe how you can take care of it:


Phoenix Plumbing Kitchen
Phoenix Plumbing Kitchen
Dealing with a clogged kitchen sink?  The pipe for your sink is probably made with a p-trap, a shape that keeps smells from the sewer from coming into your kitchen.  The problem is, sometimes this same shape gets filled up with gunk and other stuff that blocks it.  The easiest way to deal with this is to use a drain-snake, a tool that is just a long piece of plastic or metal that slides down the pipe and breaks up whatever is in the way.  This tool can work, but it isn’t the most reliable.  If this doesn’t fix the problem, the best way to deal with it is to take apart the pipe below the sink and to clean it out by hand or with a pair of pliers.

Another place your sink can get clogged is at the garbage disposal.  Be careful if you choose to attempt to fix it.  The garbage disposal can seriously hurt your hand if it is turned on.



Phoenix Plumbing Kitchen
Phoenix Plumbing Kitchen
Phoenix plumbing kitchen issues aren’t limited to the sink. Another common issue is a leaky dishwasher.  If you think there might be a leak, you can check by carefully pulling off the base plate of the dishwasher and looking below the machine to see if there is any pooled water.  Be careful not to break any of the metal or plastic when doing this.  A leak may also happen if the dishwasher doesn’t sit level.  You can check this by seeing if it rocks if you push on any side.  If it does the leak may disappear when the machine sits level.

There are many things that can go wrong with plumbing in the kitchen.  Some of the time it’s possible to fix these yourself. But be careful, plumbing can be expensive if done wrong and can cause some serious damage.  Remember, when in doubt, call a professional for all your Phoenix plumbing kitchen needs and good luck!





Saturday, October 1, 2016

Phoenix Plumbing Home Improvement: A Basic Guide to Beginning a Stress Free Project



Phoenix Plumbing Home Improvement
Phoenix Plumbing Home Improvement
To home owners in Phoenix, plumbing home improvement can be a daunting task. A clogged drain, a leaky faucet, putting in a new shower head – these are simple tasks that can be finished in less than a day. Occasionally though, our home’s plumbing needs a major project that requires a higher skill level.

You might not have trust in yourself to finish a Phoenix plumbing home improvement project, like putting in a new toilet, or you may not have any useful training in the realm of plumbing. Remember that a professional plumber is experienced, and some areas require that a plumber complete apprenticeships and take a test in order to receive their credentials. If you are thinking a plumbing home improvement project in Phoenix, decide whether you should go it alone or hire a licensed plumber to do the work for you.

Plumbing follows the simple laws of nature -- gravity, pressure, water seeking its own level. Learning this is imperative to completing your own projects. You will save yourself time, effort, and money!

The plumbing structure in your house consists of two individual subsystems. One subsystem brings water in, and the other removes wastewater. The water that is brought into your home is under enough pressure to allow it to travel upstairs, around corners, or wherever else it's needed.


Phoenix Plumbing Home Improvement
Phoenix Plumbing Home Improvement
Before beginning a Phoenix plumbing home improvementt in Phoenix, even a small one, it is a good idea to get a feeling of your plumbing system throughout your home. Conduct some basic research and get an idea of the basic concepts of plumbing. Then utilize what you learned to your personal home and try to draw out your plumbing. Try to decipher which walls have pipes in them and where the primary waste line leaves the home. The more research you have done, the less overwhelming your projects are going to be—and the simpler it will be to troubleshoot any issues.

Whether you choose to do it yourself or hire a professional plumber, make sure you know how to turn off your water. You should be aware of how to turn off t

he water valve for individual fixtures but also understand how to turn off the house’s main water. If you do not know how to do this, ask what your plumber is doing the next time he or she comes to your home and learn how to do it as well.